Pump Selection Guides

Choose the Right Pump

Product Driver Max. Gallons/Liters
Per Minute
Max. Gallons/Liters
Per Day
Max. Operating Depth
in Feet/Meters
Pumping
Environment
Atlas 2.5 101 Pneumatic 2.0 / 7.6 2,880 / 10,900 813 / 248 Harsh, Difficult
Atlas 2.5 102 Pneumatic 5.0 / 18.9 7,200 / 27,255 359 / 109 Harsh, Difficult
Atlas 2.5 103 Pneumatic 11.0 / 41.6 15,840 / 59,961 137 / 41.7 Harsh, Difficult
V-2 101 Pneumatic 2.0 / 7.6 2,880 / 10,902 555 / 169 Standard to Harsh
V-2 102 Pneumatic 5.0 / 18.9 7,200 / 27,255 243 / 74 Standard to Harsh
V-2 103 Pneumatic 11.0 / 41.6 15,840 / 59,961 84 / 25.6 Standard to Harsh
Edge 101 Pneumatic 2.0 / 7.6 2,880 / 10,902 281 / 85.6 Standard to Harsh
Edge 102 Pneumatic 5.0 / 18.9 7,200 / 27,555 119 / 36.2 Standard
Anchor 101 Electric 1.2 / 4.5 1,730 / 6,548 804 / 245 Standard to Difficult
Anchor 102 Electric 3.0 / 11.3 4,320 / 16,300 351 / 106 Standard to Difficult
Anchor 103 Electric 6.7 / 25.3 9,650 / 36,529 157 / 47 Standard to Difficult
Apollo 101 Solar / Electric 0.93 / 3.52 1,339 / 5,069 150 / 46 Standard, Remote
Apollo 102 Solar / Electric 2.27 / 8.6 3,269 / 12,370 40 / 21.3 Standard, Remote

Comparing Piston Pumps with Electric Submersibles and Airlifts

Piston Pump Electric Submersible Air Lift Pump
Principle Uses Low-flow pumping, 0–11 gpm High-flow water-well pumping; light, clear, cool liquids Low-flow pumping
How It Works A motor above the wellhead drives a sucker rod that moves a piston up and down in the well — a foot valve at well bottom allows liquid to enter while the reciprocating piston pulls liquid up. Impellers, above the submerged motor, rotate rapidly to create suction, pulling liquids into the pump. The pressure of centrifugal force pushes liquid up into the discharge pipe. Down-well pump cavity fills with liquid, pushing exhaust air to surface. High-pressure air then forces liquid up and out of pump.
Power Source Electricity grid, compressed air, solar, windmill Electric only, in the well Compressed air only, in the well
Lift Positive displacement piston movement sucks the liquid up the cylinder, liquid passes through piston top and out of discharge tee Created by rapid rotation of metal impellers in constant motion. In landfill applications, inadequate liquid levels create concern about net positive suction head (NPSH) and destructive cavitation if well runs dry. Air pressure builds in pump to force liquid out.
Stuffing Box At surface, above wellhead Down in the well
Servicing Motor and stuffing box serviced at surface, away from liquid
  • Pump is in constant contact with liquid; uncontrolled pump flow; must be pulled to service
  • All-metal parts in constant motion subject to impeller and bearing wear and cavitation
  • Motor subject to failure from high temperature, dry running, corrosion, clogging
  • With other than clear, light liquids, pumps often require replacement
Pump is in constant contact with down-well liquid; pump must be pulled from well to maintain and repair
Advantages
  • Simple operation
  • Variable, broad flow rates
  • Unaffected by vacuum
  • No pump pulling — longer life
  • Odor control
  • Handles broadest range of liquids
  • Lower cost of ownership
  • Pumps to 1,000 ft., 300 m.
  • No bio-fouling
  • Can be made explosion proof
  • High flow rate
  • Low initial cost
  • High efficiency
Works in clear liquids

Piston Pumps vs. General Airlift Pumps

SCF vs. PSIG

TDH vs. PSIG